PRESS

DIALOGUE OF CULTURES INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL
New York, Oct 20-27
First Edition 2011
16 World Cinema Features and Docs
 
The Quad Oct 20-27: Fifteen feature-length films, including:
The theatrical release of Transit Cities by Mohammad Al Hushki (Jordan)
 
SVA Theater Oct 20-23: Seven feature-length films, including:
Opening night film CIRKUS COLUMBIA by Danis Tanovic (East Coast Premiere)
Closing night film THE SKETCH OF MUJO by Koichi Omiya (NY Premiere)
 
DiALOGUE OF CULTURES INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL (DCIFF) is the world’s first film festival dedicated to the impact of globalization, which has millions of people moving to different countries, confronting or embracing new cultures. In one way or another, most of us have become modern nomads. DCIFF is based on this international spirit. The festival’s goal is to jumpstart a dialogue between cultures through the universal language of cinema. After this first edition, the festival will move to a different country every year, with Paris slated to be next year's location.
 
As festival founder Boris Cherdabayev comments, "It is not a coincidence that we chose New York as a first location of our festival, because it is here that you can see the greatest diversity of cultures living together side by side. In a sense, New York is the world’s biggest melting pot."
 
DCIFF presents 16 features and documentaries from all over the world, each of them exploring characters, which find themselves dealing with different cultures from their own in various dramatic ways. Many of these are U.S. or New York premieres:
 
1. Week-long theatrical run in The Quad, Oct 20-27: TRANSIT CITIES (Jordan) by Mohammad Al Hushki (attending)
 
Escaping a life of disconnection and emptiness abroad, thirty-something Laila returns to her native Amman, Jordan. Unannounced and uninvited, Laila attempts to construct a new life, but her simple old town is now a complex entity, a city that is being torn apart by forces of religion from the right and globalization from the left.
 
2. Opening night film, CIRKUS COLUMBIA (Bosnia-Herzegovina) by Danis Tanovic  – East Coast Premiere
 
After the fall of the Communist regime in Bosnia-Herzegovina in 1991, Divko Buntic (Miki Manojlović, Irina Palm) returns to his former home after a 20-year exile in Germany.
 
3. Special screening of BRIDE FLIGHT (Netherlands, Luxembourg) by Ben Sombogaart with star Rutger Hauer (attending)
 
Spanning over five decades, BRIDE FLIGHT is inspired by the true story of the 1953 "Last Great Air Race" London-Christchurch (NZ), and follows Esther (Anna Drijver), Ada (Karina Smulders) and Marjorie (Elise Schaap), three young women who, eager to escape post-WWII Holland, emigrate to New Zealand for what they hope will be a better life.
 
4. Closing night film, THE SKETCH OF MUJO (Japan) by Koichi Omiya (attending)
 
After the earth shook and the tsunami swept, what remains? One month has passed since the The Great East Japan earthquake.
 
The complete list of films screening at DCIFF follows in alphabetical order:
 
All that remains (Switzerland) by Pierre-Adrian Irlé (attending) & Valentin Rotelli
 
Four people—bound by the common thread of a deeply personal loss—take to the road at a pivotal moment in their lives, hoping to move ahead. Along the way they unexpectedly intersect with one another—the result of which forever alters their understanding of brotherhood, friendship, and love.
 
Back to Africa (Germany) by Othmar Schmiderer
 
Tata, Huit Huit, Sonko, Waterman and Georges are successful artists both in Africa and in Europe, where their performances in “Afrika! Afrika!” have greatly contributed to the success of this André Heller circus show. BACK TO AFRICA follows the five protagonists over a period of one year: during rehearsals, in the show – but mostly during their visits to their home countries in Africa.
 

Bollywood Dream (Brazil, India, USA) by Beatriz Seigner (attending)

 

Three Brazilian actresses decide to go to India to break into the Bollywood film industry, but once they are inside the heart of Indian Culture and Mythology, their dreams and wills start to change on the contrast between the East and the West, the ancient and the contemporary values, between the individual and the collective yearnings.

 

Bride flight (Netherlands, Luxembourg) by Ben Sombogaart with special guest Rutger Hauer (attending)

 

Spanning over five decades, BRIDE FLIGHT is inspired by the true story of the 1953 "Last Great Air Race" London-Christchurch (NZ), and follows Esther (Anna Drijver), Ada (Karina Smulders) and Marjorie (Elise Schaap), three young women who, eager to escape post-WWII Holland, emigrate to New Zealand for what they hope will be a better life.

 

Cirkus Columbia (Bosnia & Herzegovina) by Danis Tanovic (attending)

 

After the fall of the Communist regime in Bosnia-Herzegovina in 1991, Divko Buntic (Miki Manojlović, Irina Palm) returns to his former home after a 20-year exile in Germany.

 

City of life (UAE) by Ali F. Mostafa (attending)

 

City of Life is set in Dubai and intertwines the stories of three characters: a privileged Emirati man, a disillusioned Indian taxi driver, and a naïve Romanian flight attendant, living in a complex metropolis where ambition, growth and opportunity are a way of life.

 

Dance of time (South Korea) by Song Il-gon

 

Back in 1905, just before the onset of the Japanese military occupation over Joseon (present day Korea), about 300 people fled to Cuba via Mexico. With hopes of returning home wealthy, they worked tenaciously at henequen farms. They established their own Korean schools and sent money back to finance the independence movements against Japan, and even eventually partaking in the revolution of Che Guevera.

 

Dooman river (South Korea, France) by Zhang Lu (attending)

 

Writer-director Zhang Lu’s fascinating window into a rarely seen corner of rural China revolves around 12-year-old Chang-ho, living with his grandfather and mute sister along the frozen river- border with North Korea.

 

Even the rain (France, Mexico, Spain) by Iciar Bollain

 

Costa and Sebastian arrive in Cochabamba, Bolivia, to shoot a period film about Columbus’s arrival in the Americas. They’re on the tightest of budgets, but the shoot gets off to a smooth start. But things get complicated when their extras and main actor, locals to Cochabamba, rise up against the privatization of their drinking water. Their battle to get their film made intertwines with the fight of their Bolivian crewmembers, deprived of their most basic rights, prohibited from collecting even the rain.

 

Hi-So (Thailand) by Aditya Assarat

 

Ananda has returned home from studying abroad. Unsure of his career plans, he tries his hand acting in a new movie for a famous director. During the filming in a small seaside town, Zoe, his girlfriend from University, arrives for a week-long visit. But the change of country takes its toll and she soon becomes frustrated at the situation.

 

Man without cellphone (Israel) by Sameh Zoabi

 

Twenty-something Palestinian-Israeli slacker Jawdat just wants to have fun with his friends, talk on his cell phone and find love. Instead, he navigates unconvincing dates with Muslim, Christian, and even Jewish girls, and wrestles with the Hebrew college entrance exam.

 

My Tehran for sale (Iran, Australia) by Granaz Moussavi (attending)

 

In this riveting, insider’s perspective on life in Iran’s capital city, Marzieh—a terminally ill actress—wearily relates her desperate quest for political asylum through a series of interviews with an unsympathetic government official.

 

Shahada (Germany) by Burkhan Qurbani

 

Berlin, today. During a razzia for clandestine employees in a warehouse, the fates of three young German-born Muslims collide.

 

Sketch of Mujo (Japan) by Koichi Omiya (attending)

 

After the earth shook and the tsunami swept, what remains? One month has passed since the The Great East Japan earthquake.

 

This prison where I live (UK) by Rex Bloomstein (attending)

 

This is a film about two comedians. Maung Thura, better known as Zarganar, is Burma’s greatest living comic. Relentlessly victimised by the Burmese military junta, he is now in prison. Michael Mittermeier, in stark contrast, is free to practise his art of humour and provocation as one of Germany’s leading stand up comedians.

 

Transit cities (Jordan) by Mohammad Al Hushki (attending)

Escaping a life of disconnection and emptiness abroad, thirty-something Laila returns to her native Amman, Jordan. Unannounced and uninvited, Laila attempts to construct a new life, but her simple old town is now a complex entity, a city that is being torn apart by forces of religion from the right and globalization from the left.

 

VENUES:

The Quad, 34 West 13th St, tel. 212 255 8800, www.quadcinema.com

SvA Theatre, 333 West 23 St, tel 212.592.2980, www.svatheatre.com
 
TICKETS: $5 per screening
 
WEBSITE: www.dciff.net
 
For press materials, a limited number of screeners and interview requests with DCIFF organizers and filmmakers, please contact:
 
Thessa Mooij
 
646.637.4700
 
Brian Geldin
917.549.2953